Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Considering a career change - consider Education Administration

The business of education - it's where the money is these days. As a matter of fact, I am starting to encourage folks who are entering college to consider a career in Education Administration. The payout is worth the effort - here's an example:

Pamela Schau (District 150's former Treasurer/Comptroller) retired as assistant superintendent of business at suburban Chicago's Maine Township High School District 207; she has more than 25 years of finance experience; has worked as a public accountant and auditor as well as with school finances at an elementary school district, at a community college district and at a high school district. She holds an undergraduate degree in business and accounting, a master's degree in school business, a superintendent certification and is taking classes to earn a doctorate in educational leadership.

Before she retired, she was raking in a *monthly pension of $7,749.00, with a salary of $175,182.00. When she retired from Main Township to come to Peoria, her retirement payout was $244,263.00. Not a bad retirement, eh?

Then after retirement, your career is not over, you have the option of going to another school District, or getting hired as a consultant for your current one. In Schau's case, after retirement, she took a job with District 150, with a salary of $125,000 per year. She was at District 150 for one (1) year, before they let her go and paid her "roughly $12,000, plus any accrued vacation time".

The turn-off for many people who won't consider a field in Education, is they don't want to deal with children. Good news for those folks, because in some of the best jobs in Education, you don't have to deal with children.

Education Administration, definitely worth consideration.

*Source

18 comments:

Sharon Crews said...

I have never been able to understand why people who are not directly involved in the education of children (in a classroom teaching children) should be paid more than those who have no direct relationship with the children and their education.

I am NOT saying that teachers should earn these excessively high administrative salaries; I am just saying that teachers should be the highest paid.

Education is not like a business, where the excutives are often the most educated, etc. Teachers quite often have the same or better education (geared to teaching) than do the administattors. Administrators are not always experts; they just hold the right certification and were selected by another administrator.

Sharon Crews said...

Well, I messed that up by putting my negative words in the wrong place.
I did mean:
I have never been able to understand why people who are not directly involved in the education of children (in a classroom teaching children) should be paid more than those who have a direct relationship with the children and their education.

Emerge Peoria said...

The pension numbers do not include the free healthcare.

Sud O. Nym said...

Sharon, should principals make more or less than teachers?

Sharon Crews said...

Sud--First of all, I would say that all school administrators should have served X number of years in the classroom. Therefore, most of them would already have been fairly high on the incremental salary scale. Then, I don't mind if they get some added to that salary to hold a principalship. I would say that being responsible for all the students and teachers should account for something.

I will be stepping on toes here, but I have never understood why counselors should be paid more (and I think they are--for more than just the extra days they work before and after teachers report). Just like teachers, they should get paid according to the degrees above a bachelor's that they hold, but I see no reason why a counseling degree should be worth more on the salary scale that a teaching degree.

kcdad said...

Principals should NOT make more than teachers. They don't DO more than teachers. They aren't as necessary as teachers. In fact, 100 years ago or so they WERE teachers. They were the 'principal' and often ONLY teacher in a school.

kcdad said...

counselors? Do you mean the tracking guidance advisers?

They shouldn't even be in schools.

Anonymous said...

kcdad-

I would love for you to be a principal for one day to see what kind of crap they have to deal with. They get grief from above, parents, teachers and students. And in D150 they have no real power. Why would anyone in their right mind want to be a principal?

Big difference between having a cushy central office positon and being a principal.

Brooke said...

Hi Sharon,

School Social Workers, Psychologists, and Speech Pathologists do receive a responsibility factor that accounts for a percentage of pay above what teachers earn. As a School Psychologist, I can say that 150’s salary is commensurate with what other districts pay. It is unusual for districts not to include a responsibility factor due to the nature of our positions.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, and the financial mess she left behind at Maine Township resulted in the loss of 75 teachers, increased class sizes, and lots of animosity. Using Pam Schau as a role model here is appalling.

Sharon Crews said...

Brooke, I agree for the psychologists, social workers, etc. (about the responsibility factor). I am not that certain as to why counselors need extra pay. I am not putting counselors down--just don't see why they should be paid more than teachers. Most of the time they work on a one-to-one and do not have to cope with discipline problems, etc.

Anonymous said...

Sharon-

Please explain to me why you think Social Workers deserve extra pay but Counselors don't? This makes no sense at all.

Sharon Crews said...

This isn't an argument about which I feel strongly one way or the other. But, unfortunately, most of what counselors do is glorified secretarial work. Hopefully, they spend most of the rest of their time helping students find scholarships, choose colleges, etc.

I would have to know what school sociologists and psychologists actually do before I could make a strong statement one way or the other. In other words, I don't know what kind of responsibility and/or risk the two positions carry in the public schools. My guess is that District 150 has some restrictions as to the kinds of risks people who hold these positions can take with regard to questioning the personal business of students and their parents. These jobs might not hold as much responsibility as their titles imply--but I don't know that for sure.

Sharon Crews said...

Anonymous: I didn't get that Emerge was holding Schau up as a role model--I thought just as an example. Also, has anyone every discovered why Schau was fired?

Dennis in Peoria said...

Experience “A New Era in Education” on CAPtions starting this Sunday. An exclusive interview with Dr. Grenita Lathan, Dist. 150 superintendent, explains her philosophies, goals…& why she brought in the team she has. Then, Engin Blackstone tells us about Quest Charter Academy & the advantages of having that choice of education. Enter the New Era Sunday, Oct. 3rd at 5 pm, Wednesday, Oct. 6 at 7 pm, and later that night at Midnight on Comcast Cable 22 in Peoria County, East Peoria, Washington, & Creve Coeur

Anonymous said...

I will probably make a lot of errors, so please be kind. I am a product of Dist. 150. Does any one but me think that this new era in education, means breaking the unions? It has started in the custodial department. There are no new hires, now there are "indefinates". I notice that the distric is using "long term subs" more and more. I know of one long term sub teaching PE, this sub has no educational background in PE, that being the case, how come, a certified teacher, isn't able to do the same thing? To save money of course. Ms. Crews, I was a student of yours back in the 70's.

Sharon Crews said...

Hi, Anonymous student of mine--the 70s those were great years. You probably just answered one of my questions. The minutes for a couple of board meetings ago showed that many subs had been given honorable dismisals. I believe all subs had to reapply--and, as of that meeting, very few had done so. Yes, I believe you are right about attempts to break the union. I am now curious as to why a teacher isn't hired--instead of using a long-term sub.

Emerge Peoria said...

It depends on your site. Post a link and I will let you know.