Sunday, July 15, 2012

Coverage of Saturday's Stop the Violence March-Taft Homes


Dozens of Peorians took the street Saturday night in an effort to curb violence in the city. The "Stop the Violence March" took off on Adams Street and continued through the Taft Homes.

Organizer Howard Nathan said he knew he had to do something when his Mom called him, scared of the growing violence in her neighborhood. "These kids are not out here just fighting anymore," said Nathan. "They are out here shooting. They are using guns, big guns, guns we don't even know, haven't even heard of."

Participants said it's not one area of Peoria that's the problem, but violence in the entire community has to stop. Currently the city's homicide count for 2012 stands at seven.Nathan plans to march in a different area of the city each week until the violence stops.

"Every week, every week, as long as we can just get more people listening and coming out joining us," said Howard. "Who knows how long it will go, until some of this stops."

"We just got to take it to every area that's experienced a homicide, you know what I mean," said march participant Kelvin Parker. "Not even necessarily gun violence but just a death is a death. Homicide or not, a death is a death. We just got to take it city wide and not just down here. We got to take it far and beyond."

Participants said an attitude change has to take place in the city, with an emphasis on family and self-respect.

"We just got to take more interest in our children cause sometimes the children can turn to the streets if they can't turn to their parents for guidance and love," said Parker. "If we as parents give our kids that time they need to listen and see what their life is like, then I think that might stop it."

Nathan hopes the message spreads across Peoria and beyond.Source

22 comments:

Anonymous said...

Howard Nathan knows what it's like to have friends on both sides of a gun.

Howard says, "We know both - the guy that's been shot and the guy that shot him And that's what's bad. Somebody could have stopped that."

Howard wants to be that somebody.

So he helped start anti-violence rallies like this one Saturday evening.
The question that was unclear was how he knew them. Meaning when the names were released in the media or before and if before, did he turn them in? Did anyone at this March turn in information about all the shootings and the other crimes?
Until that is done, the violence will continue unabated.

Anonymous said...

reference was from WMBD's story.

Sharon Crews said...

And so what do you think Howard can do from a wheelchair physically to stop the fights? Do you think the fighters call him to tell him when and where the fight will be? I am sure he means that any time there is a shooting, the likelihood is that the participants whoever they are aren't strangers to most people in their neighborhoods. I am proud of Howard for doing what he's doing--he could be mad at the world and doing nothing at all. Do you think that being close to the situation (in the neighborhood) makes you any less helpless to find a solution?

Anonymous said...

Well I wouldd first look into Howard's own crimmal actions that continue under the radar even today, what a joke.

Anonymous said...

Or his nephew Robert who is in jail for taking a gun to Manual High School.

spikeless said...

Typical comments from the "holier than thou" crowd...you complain that "those people" need to begin policing "themselves" and whenever anyone does anything to attempt such, you post this tripe.
I applaud anyone who bothers to at least try to do something.

Unknown said...

Try all you want but the battle is lost it was supposed to be a march to end violence. look at the crowd marching and the fists in the air You really look like you want to end violence with your fist in the air. For those of you that dont get it a fist is not a non violent thing. At least look non violent. In all actuality we need more violence moms start wooping your kids asses more. Dads stick around and help out with the butt woopings. You can say it takes a village but it starts with a family.

spikeless said...

I suspect that you have never read of nor have little idea of the history or meaning of the raised fist.

Unknown said...

Ya the October revolution was so peaceful look it up and be ready to give yourself a stupid smack for your last post spikeless.

Anonymous said...

I am not complaining about people who come forward to stem the violence. I question the message it sends out to the people when they know that some of the people leading the march are selling drugs and one of the largest supp;ier in Peoria.

Dennis in Peoria said...

To: Anonymous from 7/16 9:14 pm:
I hope you have some evidence or facts to back that up, because those are very serious accusations. I have known 2 of the people involved in this particular march for over 20 years and they have always pushed messages on stopping the violence.

Unknown said...

Guess ya looked it up and you have no comment. did you at least like the artwork? I have seen it up close along with the battle pictures. and the after battle pictures. Do you still like the raised fist?

Dennis in Peoria said...

Emerge, this may be slightly off topic, but it does have to do with drugs and selling. Recent PJS article about a young man, white, who was heavily selling crack and heroin, got caught, sentenced to 5 years in prison REHAB! Have any African-Americans
who got caught with same amount of drugs got this kind of sweet deal? Here is the link:
http://www.pjstar.com/news/x1052259709/Drug-rehab-requested-by-judge

Anonymous said...

Dennis, very interesting that you bring that up. I read that article and came to the same conclusion.

Hedy Elliott-Gardner

spikeless said...

I didn't particularly need to look it up. I was well aware that it was used during the Russian revolution. It was also used at approximately the same time by the Wobblies. The usage of the symbol actually dates to Bronze Age civilization and has historically connotated strength through unity and solidarity rather than striking out at someone or something. The concept is that while each finger may be weak there is great strength when they are joined to form a fist.

While I personally would probably not have chosen to use the symbol in the march, I do believe that it is appropriate. The Afican-American community is confronted regularly with the violence. Many are afraid to act...many feel impotent. The concept of strength through unity is very appropriate to the issue.

Your condescension is as amazing as your myopic view.

spikeless said...

Dennis and Hedy -
The sentence is not a sweet deal. I'm not sure that the atricle accurately conveys what it is.
The person is simply sentenced to 5 years DOC. The judge includes a recommendation for drug treatment. There is no separate sentence to Rehab. The person is in general population unless and until DOC has space available at one of its facilities with a more in depth drug treatment program. The inmate serves his or her sentence without regard to completion of the program, apart from some relatively minimal penalties or rewards that can be applied for completion or failure.
These recommendations are made in sentences in Peoria a fair amount of times but simply don't hit the PJS. they are not limited to drug offenses but are used more in circumstances where drug usage has led to another offense. Many of those recommendations are for African-American offenders. Many defendants prefer not to have the recommendation made since it can affect or delay their placement into less secure settings where greater educational services and work opportunities are available. There is also the risk of some penaly for falure to complete the program without regard to the reason for noncompletion.

Anonymous said...

Dennis you can push for stopping violence and still sell drugs in the community at the same time. You may work in the black community but remember you live in Pekin. I know more thab two people that was at the march too and know what they are doing and so do others thats around and not just here cause they work in the black community nothing personal its just real talk.

Dennis in Peoria said...

Those that are organizing and hosting these marches are having trouble understanding one glaring fact: not enough caucasians are participating in these marches. The whole issue of violence is not a 'Black' problem, it's a 'Peoria' problem. Don't wait until an incident of violence injures or kills someone in an area that is predominately white (My words).

Next march is Saturday, July 21st meeting 6 pm at Salvation Army on Nebraska to march through Pierson Hills. I was at the Taft March, will get video footage uploaded this week.

meanjarhead said...

In the Corps we used a closed fist to mean stop. I didn't know i was supporting the red army, Crap, Better tell the wife we are moving to Cuba.( the country not the Fulton County town)

Unknown said...

The black community is running the white people out of town Peoria to white people isn't a home its a trap

Emerge Peoria said...

Have you left yet? If not, when can we expect you to go?

Anonymous said...

Hahaha! Good one, Emerge! Lol